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Pollinators in the Garden: Bees, Birds & Butterflies

by Karen Hurtubise on May 24, 2016

in Around Campus, Featured Classes, Featured Teacher, In the Garden

I just finished teaching a weekend class on pollinators and gardening at the Folk School. My class was a great group of folks. We learned about seeding starting and growing native milkweeds for monarch eggs and caterpillars, planting flowers, native shrubs and trees for bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds, the challenges of neonicotinoids and herbicides. The weekend exhibited beautiful May weather! Enjoy our photo album:

13265881_1561794134115085_2642922861034997978_nJohn Clarke in the Folk School bee yard, showing the class the old bee hives, plus two brand new Russian bee colonies installed from the Beekeeping Class three weeks ago with Virginia Webb. Russian bees seem to be more varrora mite resistant than our beloved Italian honey bees.

 

Planting milkweed and dividing irises in the pollinator garden at the folk school. Dug up some lemon balm divisions. The class at work on Pollinator Row, planting milkweed and dividing irises. We also dug up some lemon balm divisions. TIP: If you want to plant milkweed in your garden, don’t buy tropical milkweed, Asclepius curassavica.The University of Georgia is researching the non-native variety to see if the tropical variety is harmful to our mountain monarchs… it’s a hot debate right not, so best to stay away from that variety until we know it is safe.

 

13221509_1561794160781749_1437658674858752624_n Looking for the Queen

 

13265881_1561794174115081_7094206363988554162_nWhite milkweed

 

13245374_1561794190781746_1957845971437874133_nNo bees, no cherries. Mason bees and other native bees are super important pollinators.

 

13254240_1561794214115077_3113044933981277578_nWildflower edges matter greatly to pollinators. Leaving unmowed areas for pollinator habitat and nectar plants helps the food chain of wildlife.

 

 

13220814_1561794240781741_6723937010474940742_nDay is done. Wild sumac are great pollinators and the fruit brews into a delicious pink lemonade type drink with a little honey from the bees and water.

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