Festival barn before opening

Festival barn before opening

Saturday morning was chilly but at least the skies were blue.  After over a week of rain we had crossed our fingers hoping the clouds would float on through Brasstown without drenching Fall Festival with unpleasant rain.

And so it was sunny, but those who stopped by in the early morning had to bundle up to enjoy it.  At 10 a.m. sharp Pretty Bird, Annie Fain Liden and Pearl Mueller, took the stage in the festival barn.  The two ladies sang and played banjo and fiddle tunes for the vendors.  Soon an audience had plopped themselves down on the hay bales in front of the stage.  At noon the Brasstown Cloggers took the stage and impressed us all.

Brasstown Cloggers

Brasstown Cloggers

While the entertainment on stage rotated between acts I worked in the Folk School booth selling t-shirts.  I watched as people’s faces lit up when they saw this year’s design.  More than once people said they were buying the new shirt to add it to their collection.

Before long mugs of coffee were exchanged for cups of sweet tea and lemonade.  The Folk School BBQ Kitchen opened at 11 a.m. and soon a line formed in front of the window.  Now I don’t know about you, but I think there are few things in this world better than BBQ and the Folk School does it right.  When they hand you the meal, in exchange for a mere $6, with the weight of the full plate in your hand the least you can do is try to find a good place to sit so you can hurry up and enjoy it.  I sat in the grass with friends and family.

The confusing thing about fall weather is the drastic change in temperature whether in the shade or in the sun.   By mid-afternoon the day was warm.

Pathway down to more craft booths

Pathway down to more craft booths

Down by Doris Carringer’s food booth her grandchildren helped her sell homemade candied apples and sourdough bread.  They wore matching aprons made by Doris, and she had one herself that said “Nanna.”  Luckily I wasn’t hungry or it would have been difficult to stroll past the chicken kebobs from the Episcopal Church tent or the funnel cakes sold by the Murphy Public Library, and I definitely wouldn’t have been able to say no to a fried apple pie had anyone offered.

Three generations helped sell baked goods at Fall Festival

Three generations helped sell baked goods at Fall Festival

Don’t tell anyone…but I did eventually settle for the homemade strawberry icecream from Little Brasstown Baptist Church because well – it’s tradition.  And I enjoyed it  while listening to the last few tunes by The Songtellers down at the Craft Shop stage.