The Photographic Tool Box with Stephanie Gross

Do you have a basic understanding of your DSLR camera and want to learn more in-depth techniques for improving your photography? Check out The Photographic Tool Box on July 22–27, 2018 with instructor Stephanie Gross. Summertime at the Folk School provides an abundance of photographic material: pastoral landscapes, interesting folks, gardens, old buildings, barns, music, dance, craft studios. Stephanie has a BFA in Photography from the Rhode Island School of Design and has been making and thinking about photography for 25 years. Enjoy our interview!

CP: How did you get started in photography?

SG: I had an amazing photography teacher in high school who is an incredible photographer and was also a great teacher (not always the case). We’re still friends  and I occasionally shoot with him. I assisted him after I graduated high school, through college.

I was interested in both photography and ceramics. I chose RISD because I could do both. I could make pots, but they were a creative dead end for me. Photography was scary and I had to struggle to learn to make pictures, but it’s been that struggle that’s kept me interested for 30+ years.

CP: What is your favorite subject matter to shoot?

SG: Stories, specifically people with stories. I suppose that’s anyone from the right point of view, but it’s more the search for what makes someone or some place interesting that’s my favorite.

Even in the most boring situations, I start to look at faces, at the light, playing with the background, composition, etc. It’s like a game. You know something fascinating is going on, but how do you show it? Continue reading The Photographic Tool Box with Stephanie Gross

Wanderlust: The Art of Travel Photography with Elizabeth Larson

If turning your vacation to the Folk School into an exploration of travel photography sounds like a dream exploration, be sure to check out our upcoming class Wanderlust: The Art of Travel Photography taught by Elizabeth Larson. Elizabeth has been a professional photographer for 26 years. She specializes in documentary wedding photography, lifestyles, natural portraiture, travel, and editorial work. Join Elizabeth on our pastoral 300-acre campus in the Appalachian Mountains and learn how to capture the spirit of your travels through the camera lens. Enjoy our interview and find out a little more about Elizabeth!

Courtyard at Castello di Colognole, Greve in Chianti, Tuscany. Photo by Elizabeth Larson.

CP: How did you get started in photography?

EL: Inspired by my dad, who is a retired travel writer & photojournalist now, I decided to take a semester of beginning photography in college & started working part-time in a camera store. Then I moved into assisting well-established photographers, both commercial & wedding/portrait and the rest is history. I got hooked!

View from gardens at Castello di Colognole overlooking vineyards and olive groves. Photo by Elizabeth Larson.

CP: What is your favorite subject matter to shoot?

EL: In my spare time, I love to photograph flowers/plants/gardens and travel photography, whenever I get the opportunity. I enjoy photographing people too, but this is what I do professionally full time (weddings, portraits, headshots, events). The other aspect of photography is what I do for fun and inspiration. However, I have been paid for some of my work when it comes to travel & garden photography. I also have a current show of my travel photography at a local winery, and those prints are for sale. In addition, I have a photo on the same NC Winery/Vineyard’s wine label & they’ve used it every year since 2009. I’m an avid gardener and I love to travel and photography is another love so putting them together makes sense.

CP: Nikon or Canon?

EL: Canon photographer. I had the opportunity to shoot with a Nikon earlier this summer and I admit I liked it! However, it’s too late to switch. I have too much invested in Canon! I still love my Leica CL film camera and I have a Pentax K1000 that I occasionally run B&W infrared film through.

CP: What is your favorite lens? What is always in your gear bag?

EL: I use my 24-70mm/f2.8 “L” lens most often but also love my 80-200mm/f 2.8 “L” lens but it’s so heavy! Also an old favorite is my 100mm Macro 2.8 lens for close ups. I always have back-up equipment in my bag, plenty of batteries, and memory cards. Back-up equipment is crucial when you photograph weddings.

Continue reading Wanderlust: The Art of Travel Photography with Elizabeth Larson

Waking of the Bear

Photo by Troy Dale
Photo by Troy Dale

Check out the blog Wakingofthebear.com written by Folk School student Troy Dale. Troy took our photography class “Capture Nature through the Lens” with Liz Domingue last week and here are some of his photos. Be sure to check out more of the photos he took in class on his Flickr page

Photo by Troy Dale
Photo by Troy Dale

 

Photo by Troy Dale
Photo by Troy Dale

Nancy Cutrer’s Video Shows Us what the Folk School Experience is All About

Nancy Cutrer, wife to one of our wonderful instructors, has produced a video capturing the sense of what the folk school experience is like.

“I was a guest of the photography instructor at the Folk School during the week of Sept 16-22, 2012. This video is a compilation of some of the photographs I took during the week. I tried to include photos of all of the classes that week as well as images that I hope translate the feeling and the atmosphere in and around the campus. It was a wonderful week and I took away sooo much with me. I can’t wait to go back.” -Nancy Cutrer