In the Studio: Eco Printing with Kathy Hays

Kathy Hays displays her eco print creations outside the Wet Room.
Kathy Hays displays her eco print creations outside the Wet Room.
Class projects
Class projects

I stopped by the Wet Room to visit Kathy Hays’ recent class “Eco Printing Meets Felt Making” to see what they were creating. I talked to Kathy about her craft and the joys of eco printing. Enjoy our interview!

CP: Tell me about where you’re from, what you do there, and about your craft.

KH: I’m from Florida, an unusual area for felt making due to the climate. I began making felt here at the Folk School in 1999. After struggling and trying to figure how to make felt on my own, I was able to come here and after the first day, it was like all my questions were answered! The rest of the week was purely a bonus.

CP: How is Nuno Felting different from other felting?

KH: Felt making is wool fibers being arranged and then adding soap, water, and agitation. In the case of Nuno Felting, you are merging fibers through another fabric. The term is a little ambiguous. That fabric can be cotton, linen… anything that is thin enough for it to come through. It creates a unique texture when it does that. Continue reading In the Studio: Eco Printing with Kathy Hays

Asia to Appalachia: Japanese Influence at the Folk School

Bonsai by Tim Ryan
Bonsai by Tim Ryan

Japanese aesthetic philosophy inspires us all the way from the Far East to the Folk School. Radically different from Western design, Japanese design principles mesh especially well with the Folk School due to an emphasis on simplicity, unobtrusive beauty, function, irregularity, weathered textures, nature, and tranquility. Cultivate a bonsai, write a haiku, try Ikebana flower arranging, learn about traditional Shibori dyeing, demystify Asian spices, create raku vessels for a Japanese tea ceremony and much more at the Folk School. Embrace Wabi-Sabi and Zen philosophy with these 2015 offerings focusing on Japanese design and techniques:

Beading by Judy Walker
Beading by Judy Walker

Beaded Kumihimo
with Judy Walker • February 1-6

Learn to do kumihimo – the beautiful Japanese braiding technique – with beads! Use a braiding disk for consistent results, starting with the easiest cords. Progress to more intricate designs and discuss the various results achieved with different materials and with the traditional marudai stand.

Haiku Poetry Writing Workshop
with Redenta Soprano • February 6-8 Weekend

Haiku Poetry by Redenta Soprano
Haiku Poetry by Redenta Soprano

Haiku is a traditional Japanese poem, consisting of 3 lines and 17 syllables. It is easy and fun to write, as well as an expedient, creative way to capture life’s special moments. Try your hand at it, using the winter beauty of the mountains as inspiration. Bring your powers of observation and depart with a:

Small book of haiku
At the end of the weekend
To take home with you! Continue reading Asia to Appalachia: Japanese Influence at the Folk School

The Magic of Indigo

Class Photo: Yoruba Batik, Adire, and Tie Dye with Gasali Adeyemo
Class Photo: Yoruba Batik, Adire, and Tie Dye
with Gasali Adeyemo
Gasali and Charlotte by the Indigo Dye Pot
Gasali and Charlotte by the indigo dye pot

I had the pleasure of assisting in the Science of Bread class in the Cooking Studio at the beginning of this month. As a class that produces more warm crusty delicious bread than we know what to do with, you can imagine that we make friends with other classes pretty quickly. Our next door neighbors in the Wet Room, the Surface Design and Dyeing Class with Gasali Adeyemo and assisted by Charlotte Crittenden, received the bulk of the bread bounty. In return, their class invited us to watch one of the most exciting moments of their class: the magic moment of the indigo dye pot!

Continue reading The Magic of Indigo